20 Years as Executive Director – Looking Back, Looking Forward

Lara Iglitzin headshot arms sm fileThis week marks 20 years for me at the helm of the Jackson Foundation.  I’m proud and honored to have served as Executive Director for two decades.  During my tenure, I’ve had the good fortune to work with my dedicated Board members and great staff on any number of meaningful activities.

My personal highlight reel includes a 1995 Jerusalem conference celebrating the ground-breaking Jackson-Vanik Amendment  — which helped over a million Soviet Jews emigrate from the USSR.  That conference attracted hundreds of Soviet Jewish emigres now living in Israel as well as a host of Israeli and American politicians, including the late Prime Minister Itzhak Rabin, who was assassinated only months later.  Since I wrote my Master’s thesis on Senator Jackson’s legislation and the story behind it, that conference had tremendous significance for me.  The famous Jewish dissident from the Soviet era, Natan Sharansky, worked closely with us on the conference, and our Chairman, Helen Jackson, joined us in Jerusalem.  It was unforgettable.

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Helen Jackson, Lara Iglitzin, and Natan Sharansky in Jerusalem in 1995

I’ve also reflected on the role that the Foundation has played to strengthen the Jackson School at the University of Washington.  Dozens of policy conferences, graduate fellowships, the Jackson Professorship, the Golub Chair, lecture series, the new PhD program, the Helen Jackson Chair in Human Rights – we’ve helped usher in key changes at the Jackson School.  As a graduate of the School, it has meant a lot to me to help the University do what it does best:  provide first-class education to young people, in this case our future leaders in international policy.  It has been a richly rewarding relationship, one that makes me highly value the intellectual depth of the faculty at the Jackson School.

Lara meets with Jackson School students
Lara meets with Jackson School graduate students this fall.

We started supporting human rights in Russia over 20 years ago – after the break-up of the Soviet Union.  In the more than two decades since, we’ve watched the ups and downs of civil society in Russia with alarm, and our grant making and programs have changed dramatically in response to events.  That’s a sadness to remark upon, given the downward trend in rights under Putin’s Russia.  We are still raising our voice on that front, however! Last year we brought a group of civil society leaders from Russia to Seattle and Washington, DC under a grant from the U.S. State Department.  This trip was inspirational for the delegation and continues to provide encouragement and ideas for these dedicated individuals back in Russia today.

Jackson Foundation 2014 Russian NGO Delegation
Jackson Foundation 2014 Russian NGO Delegation in Seattle

Lately we have two new programs which have galvanized the Board and staff:  the first is helping to lend our resources and intellectual fire-power to the climate change world, focusing particularly on the national and global security implications for the U.S. around climate.  The Jackson name lends credence and balance to discussions on this critical issue.  We are helping to leverage our work by highlighting the military viewpoint and bringing other foundations to the table.  This is a new area for me and it has been wonderful to be challenged to learn more about the climate field.

Washington D.C. Climate Change and National Security Briefing
Washington D.C. Climate Change and National Security Briefing

Second, we have launched an initiative to train a new generation of Jackson-inspired young people, with the launch of the Jackson Leadership Fellows Program.  It’s been invigorating to choose and begin to mentor the eight outstanding young professionals who comprise our first class here in Seattle.  I’ve been energized by my interactions with each of them and feel it is one of the most exciting initiatives that the Foundation has embarked upon.

Jackson Fellows with Anna Marie Jackson Laurence and Foundation President John Hempelmann
Jackson Fellows with Anna Marie Jackson Laurence and Foundation President John Hempelmann

It’s easy for me to think of the extended Jackson community as a family – one that includes our Board members, past and present, as well as former and current staff members of the Foundation, and “Scoop’s Troops” – those who worked with Jackson on his own staff or on one of his committee staff positions.  It also comprises our many partners and grantees over the years, at the Jackson School, the National Bureau of Asian Research, the Kennan Institute, City Club Seattle, and countless other colleagues.  It’s an engaging group and one that has a remarkable cohesion because of the respect for Senator Jackson that unites everyone.  It has made this a great place to work.

One thing I’ve learned at the Foundation over the course of the last twenty years– while the specific programs may change, the work in international affairs, environment and energy, human rights and public service still are highly relevant in today’s world.

I look forward to working together with all of you to carry on the Jackson legacy.  I hope you’ll get in touch.

Lara Iglitzin, Executive Director

Sanctions and Russia: Europe and the U.S. Take Stock

“Vladimir Putin is not the man we hoped he would be or we thought he would be.”  David J. Riley, 1st Secretary, foreign and security policy, British Embassy to the U.S., made this remark on a fascinating panel discussion in Seattle about Russian sanctions and the future of the U.S.-EU and Russia relationship convened by the Jackson Foundation, in partnership with the Trade Development Alliance of Greater Seattle, in early October.  William Pomeranz, deputy director of the Washington, DC-based Kennan Institute, and Nelson Dong, partner, Dorsey & Whitney, head of its National Security Law Group, also joined the panel.  I moderated the discussion, which veered toward the pessimistic, particularly in light of the very recent Russia move into the Syrian conflict.

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Panelists David Riley and Nelson Dong

There was considerable speculation about Russian President Vladimir Putin’s motives, both in seizing Crimea and moving into Eastern Ukraine, and in the Syrian situation.  “Putin wants to show that Russia is a major international player,” Pomeranz said, and Riley agreed, adding “Putin’s isolation [due to Western sanctions] has hurt him the most.  He wants to remind everyone that he matters.”

Nelson Dong confirmed that in his assessment of the business sector, sanctions have hurt Russia considerably and noted that the policy was deliberately crafted to hit certain areas:  “The sanctions against Russia are unlike those in the past against Cuba and Iran.  The Russian sanctions are extraordinarily targeted.” His conclusion:  “Sanctions, along with reduced oil prices, have resulted in a recession in Russia.”

Will Pomeranz and Panelists
Left to Right:  Lara Iglitzin, Will Pomeranz, David Riley, and Nelson Dong

Will Pomeranz agreed that Russia has suffered internally due to its aggressive foreign policy and tied Putin’s latest moves in Syria to the worsening economic situation in Russia: “With the growing economic recession, there is a need to distract public attention away from that issue.  On television, the government is showing all Syria, all the time” in a deliberate policy to change the conversation.

Pomeranz and Riley, when asked about the possibility of a split between the EU and the U.S. on Russia policy, agreed that, as Pomeranz said, “Putin is the great unifier – he has unified the EU in their actions to undertake sanctions against Russia; he has unified what is left of the Ukraine against him.  Even in the halls of Congress Putin has caused unity!”

There was a clear consensus that Putin had caused the West to rethink its relationship with Russia, moving from a view of Moscow as a strategic partner to that of a “strategic competitor,” in Riley’s words.  The increasing crackdown on civil society in Russia, something that the Jackson Foundation has been closely monitoring in the human rights and NGO sector there, provides the backdrop for the uptick in tensions between the U.S., Europe and Russia moving forward.

This will be one of several events this year that the Jackson Foundation will convene in Seattle relating to heightened concerns about Russia’s behavior at home and abroad.

Lara Iglitzin

Executive Director

 

Honoring Professor Kenneth B. Pyle

Kenneth Pyle webOur culture celebrates our sports heroes – from Michael Jordan to Derek Jeter to Kobe Bryant.  We marvel at their ability to play on, through pain and years, achieving fame and success.  Few of us have had the opportunity to publicly celebrate the careers of other, less famous giants in their fields.  I’m delighted to cast the spotlight on one such unsung hero, Professor Kenneth B. Pyle, longtime historian and teacher at the University of Washington’s Jackson School of International Studies.  Ken – retiring after 51 consecutive years of teaching, which certainly qualifies him for MVP – has won numerous teaching awards over the years.  Equally important, he’s touched the lives and shaped the scholarship of thousands of young minds at the University.  His students speak of him fondly, whether they now serve in the State Department or teach at other universities around the nation.

I’ve had the good fortune to have had Dr. Pyle on the Jackson Foundation Board of Governors during my tenure on the staff.  He was a founding member of our Board, having forged a close alliance with Senator Jackson in the days when Ken headed what was to become the Jackson School, and Jackson sought Ken out for advice on China and U.S. foreign policy toward Asia.  Ken has spoken movingly of that seminal relationship, which began with Senator Jackson dropping by Ken’s office at the U.W. and peppering him with questions for two hours.  Jackson and Pyle shared a concern that there was a national shortage of people who truly understood the workings of Asian and Slavic countries, and both believed that an immersion in the study of these areas was critical to achieve an understanding in U.S.-China and U.S.-Soviet relations.  From that moment forward, Scoop and Ken collaborated – in enhancing international studies at the University, in traveling to China together in the early days of détente with China, and in mentoring young students.

Anne & Kenneth Pyle Professorship

We at the Jackson Foundation value the role that Professor Pyle has played at the Jackson School and at the University of Washington for the past 50-plus years.  We were delighted to name a recent professorship at the Jackson School in American foreign policy in honor of Anne H. H. and Kenneth B. Pyle out of respect and recognition of Ken’s major achievements in his field and his leadership of the Jackson School, and of his wife Anne’s integral partnership with Ken in that success.At the end of this month, there will be a public program to celebrate the career of Ken Pyle.  We invite you to join us for this substantive program, featuring distinguished professor T.J. Pempel, University of California Berkeley, and many top-level colleagues from the Jackson School.

Congratulations, Ken.

Lara Iglitzin, Executive Director

Inspiring Young Leaders

Many of you have heard by now of the Foundation’s exciting new initiative – a young leadership program called the Henry M. Jackson Leadership Fellows.  We’ve just launched the inaugural class of this 9-month program, which will include leadership training, mentoring, networking, and substantive work on individual projects.

As we showcased in an earlier message, the class is outstanding.  The word “inspiring” may sometimes be overused – but in this case I can honestly say that interviewing the 35 fellowship candidates filled me with hope for a time when our civic life will again ring with bipartisan discourse and engaged, active citizens.  As one of the Foundation’s Vice Presidents, Craig Gannett, put it in welcoming remarks to the Fellows, “listening to all of you gives me optimism for the future.”

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2016 Fellows with Anna Marie Laurence, Secretary of the Board, and John Hempelmann, President, in front of the Jackson bust in Everett, Washington outside the Jackson home.

While we eventually chose only eight fellows, a few bright spots came through during the interview process.  First, the candidates showed a tremendous interest in leadership – in all its facets – and a strong desire to learn the skills and attributes of great leaders.  Second, they hunger to engage outside of work spheres and to connect more deeply with new colleagues and novel ideas.  Third, these young professionals want to involve diverse aspects of our community into their work – both professionally and in their volunteer pursuits.  Finally – and perhaps most heartening – they believe that Senator Jackson’s life and achievements can speak to this next generation.  While many of the candidates did not previously know of Senator Jackson, they came to the interviews inspired by what they had read about him, especially in The Nature of Leadership book that we make available on our website.

The Foundation embarked on its new Fellowship program in part to reach out to the next generation and inculcate them with the Jackson values.  The year has just begun – and yet it is already clear that those values – and the man behind them – remain relevant today.

We hope you will join us at some of the many events this year in which the Fellows will be involved.

Lara Iglitzin

Executive Director

 

 

Remembering Ben Wattenberg

authorbenBen Wattenberg, conservative author and PBS host, and long-time member of the extended Jackson circle, died on Sunday at the age of 81.  Wattenberg was a confidant of Senator Jackson, working closely with the Jackson campaigns in both 1972 and 1976 when Jackson launched presidential campaigns.  Wattenberg believed that the Democratic party had moved too far to the left, and he promoted Jackson’s candidacy with passion and skill.

Wattenberg gained national attention with the publication of his book “The Real Majority,” coauthored with Richard Scammon.  It came to be known as the “Bible of both political parties” and touched on many issues which have since come to the forefront of national politics, including crime, race, and traditional economic concerns.

In later years he continued his role as an outspoken and well-regarded pundit, becoming well-known for his PBS series, “Think Tank with Ben Wattenberg” and “In Search of the Real America.”

When Ben presented the Henry M. Jackson Memorial Lecture for the Jackson Foundation in 1996, entitled “Values Matter Most:  Issues of the Contemporary American Political Scene,” Foundation Chairwoman Helen Jackson introduced him with the following words:  “Scoop admired Ben for his tremendous grasp on the pulse of the country and the American people.  Few commentators have proved to be so prescient.”

We are proud of our association with Ben and of his commitment to core American values as well as to the Jackson legacy.  He will be missed.  Please see the obituary from the New York Times.

Lara Iglitzin, Executive Director

Supporting Russian Civil Society

Lara Iglitzin
Lara Iglitzin

I recently had the opportunity to be part of an invitation-only discussion on supporting civil society in Russia.  The small conference under the auspices of the European Union Civil Society Forum was held in London, and featured European foundations and a few larger U.S. foundations.  The Jackson Foundation was invited given its 30 year role funding in Russia and promoting concerns of U.S.-Russian relations and rule of law.  It was very interesting to hear the European perspective on the ongoing civil society crisis in Russia – after all, they are next door to the Russian bear – and to share the thoughts of the Jackson Foundation with colleagues.

Given the crackdown on civil society in Russia under President Vladimir Putin, worsening since 2012, there is a dramatically smaller space for civil society in Russia today.  Funders discussed why they should keep funding in Russia, and how best to do it, given the risks to NGOs and the barriers placed on foreign funds.  Many of us felt that one goal of giving money to Russian NGOs has to be to try to retain and bolster that civic space to ensure it doesn’t shrink any further.  Yet with the Russian government’s demonizing of Western countries – especially the U.S., and particularly of Western money flowing to NGOs, how can a foundation do that effectively? The obstacles placed by the Russian government in terms of regulations, laws, and the threat of NGOs being labeled “foreign agents” – and faced with fines and organizational closure – has put a damper on the ability of Western foundations to be strategic and effective with their dollars.

"Foreign Agent"
“Foreign Agent” label on NGO building

Given the stakes, some reaffirmed their belief in “core support” for NGOs – i.e., basic, institutional grants given with the aim of paying salaries and rent and allowing work to continue.  Yet foundation staff are hearing from disillusioned Board members who wonder if the resources are being used strategically.  Donor fatigue and burnout, given the trajectory of Putin’s Russia, is impacting the field.

Smaller foundations such as the Jackson Foundation have to utilize different strategies to be effective in this climate, given the much reduced resources available for grants and programs.  I was heartened to see that some of the tactics we have used in the last several years were seen as useful, both by the Russian NGOs and by foundations with significantly more resources.  Specifically, we have been:

  • Supporting delegations of Russian civil society activists on study tours to the U.S., with in-depth training and peer-to-peer consultations. Last year we brought a delegation to the U.S. to learn from colleagues in U.S. nongovernmental organizations. Every person who has had an opportunity to experience a study tour returns and briefs others with what she has learned. It is hard to overstate the person-to-person value of such programs; and
  • Raising awareness through programs in Washington, DC and Seattle about what is going on in Russia today in domestic and foreign policy, the impact on U.S.-Russian relations, the state of civil society and the NGO community, the development of the next generation of civil sector leaders, and the like.  We plan more in the years ahead.
Seattle International Fountain
2014 Russian NGO Delegation

In my two decades at the Jackson Foundation, one of the oft-quoted phrases from those who knew Senator Jackson is his belief to “stay the course.”  The meaning is clear: when the going gets tough, you keep steady in what you believe in. In keeping with that tradition and with the Senator’s legacy of promoting democracy, Foundation will continue find strategic and effective means to make civil society in Russia a priority.

Lara Iglitzin, Executive Director

On Leadership: Second-Term Presidents

In a revealing discussion about the challenges of 2nd term presidencies, the Bipartisan Policy Center and the Jackson Foundation convened a panel that looked at the Obama 2nd term through the lens of the Clinton and Reagan presidencies.  Sandy Berger, National Security Advisor to President Bill Clinton and Kenneth Duberstein, White House Chief of Staff in the late Reagan tenure, joined USA Today Washington Bureau Chief Susan Page for a discussion moderated by John Fortier of BPC’s Democracy Project and an expert himself in 2nd term presidencies.

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John Hempelmann

John Hempelmann, President of the Jackson Foundation, set the tone for the dialogue by noting Scoop Jackson’s reputation for problem-solving across the aisle and posing the question as to whether a president from one political party, in his lame duck term, could work successfully with a Congress led by the rival party. This led to some discussion of how a president shapes his legacy while in office.  Duberstein felt that one key to success was keeping policy goals paramount.  He said that President Reagan was not thinking about his legacy when he challenged Mikhail Gorbachev to “tear down this wall,” but rather was committed to promoting liberty and freedom for the citizens of the Soviet Union. Sandy Berger, who worked closely with President Clinton on foreign policy matters, agreed that presidents should not be thinking about their legacy, but rather “focus on getting things done.”  There was general consensus that “legacy building” while a president was in office was counterproductive.  “Legacies are written after the fact,” as Berger put it.

Sandy Berger
Ken Duberstein and Sandy Berger

Ken Duberstein emphasized the importance of relationships forged in the early days of a presidency as bearing fruit in the later, more challenging years.  “It matters what the president did in the first years of his presidency, in terms of what happens in the last two years.”  He was particularly critical of President Obama for what he called a lack of relationship building in Congress in his first term. “This hurts him now,” he argued.

Susan Page
Susan Page

Susan Page agreed that presidents facing the waning years of their tenure do not generally have a natural inclination toward bipartisanship and yet “want to have an impact.”  She said that they ask themselves what is meaningful to them that they could realistically accomplish, giving the example of Iran policy in terms of one of President Obama’s “big goals.” Berger agreed, arguing that Iran, Cuba, and the strategic re-balance to Asia present opportunities for Obama to find major policy accomplishments in his final two years.

Part of the challenge for presidents at this late stage  is gaining traction with the press. Page noted the tendency of the media to focus on the 2016 election and away from the current president.  “It is difficult to combat the big story, difficult for a president in his second term to get the attention of the media,” she concluded.

This program is one of a series by the Foundation focusing on bipartisanship, including briefings about political discourse in Washington State.  Other programs with the Bipartisan Policy Center include a discussion of Congress, foreign policy and the challenge of bipartisanship and a dialogue between two former Senate Majority leaders about how they forged a civil relationship.  The 1 ½ hour program on 2nd Term Presidencies can be viewed here.

Lara Iglitzin, Executive Director

Sanctions as a Tool of American Foreign Policy: Do They Work?

The Jackson Foundation and the Wilson Center’s Kennan Institute jointly sponsored a timely conference last week in Washington, D.C., focused on sanctions as a tool of American foreign policy:  Do they work?  Why are some sanctions more effective than others?  When do they fail?  What are the unintended consequences of sanctions policies?  The conference brought some rigor to often politicized discussions about sanctions.  Speakers assessed sanctions from a historical perspective in an effort to determine what has been effective and why.  Panelists then explored current-day dilemmas facing Congress and the Executive Branch – specifically, Iran, Russia, and Cuba.

Ambassador Daniel Fried

A few themes emerged.  One, voiced by Ambassador Daniel Fried, Coordinator for Sanctions Policy at the U.S. Department of State in his keynote address and echoed by others throughout the day, is that multilateral sanctions offer the most effective policy.  Working together in coordination with other nations is the best recipe for success – with U.N. Security Council sanctions as the “gold star” of sanctions policy.  When the U.S. and Europe joined together to sanction Russia for its Ukraine aggression, for example, that policy had a better chance of hitting the desired target.  Least effective, on the other hand, are unilateral sanctions – think U.S. sanctions on Cuba.

Second, sanctions historically don’t work well when aimed at regime change or at an authoritarian government.  Those sanctions tend to spur a popular backlash in the country being sanctioned.  On a panel I moderated that took a historical look at sanctions, Daniel Drezner of the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University called this “rallying around the flag.”  And Ted Henken, of Baruch College, CUNY, a specialist on Cuba, quoted Raul Castro to this effect, “The more you punch us and kick us, mas revolucion,” he said.  “Instead of promoting human rights and weakening the government, sanctions on Cuba have done the opposite,” Henken concluded.

Lara Iglitzin, Daniel Drezner, George Lopez, Ted Henken
Lara Iglitzin, Daniel Drezner, George Lopez, Ted Henken

Finally, the conference explored the popularity today of so-called “smart sanctions,” which target financial services as well as specific industries and individuals closely tied with the sanctioned government.  According to Ambassador Fried, “Sanctions should hit where they have the right balance of impact: hit the target of sanctions, not us and our friends.”  Richard Perle of the American Enterprise Institute and a Jackson Foundation Board member said that “smart sanctions are possible in a way they never could be before” and argued that “they had undoubtedly driven the Iranians to the negotiating table.”

Panel
Mark Gitenstein, Meg Lundsager, Richard Perle

As John Hempelmann, Foundation president, said in his opening remarks, “the issue of sanctions holds special resonance for the Jackson Foundation, given the historic Jackson-Vanik Amendment.  That legislation provided a new approach to foreign policy that explicitly linked America’s human rights ideals with economic relations through targeted sanctions on the USSR.”  It also gave the sanctioned party a very clear path of what it could do to get sanctions lifted.  Forty years later, we heard that sanctions with a very clear policy goal – and incentives to get them removed – will be the most likely to succeed.

John Hempelmann
John Hempelmann

Following the event the Wilson Center conducted interviews with some of the panelists on their perspectives on sanctions.  View them here.

Lara Iglitzin, Executive Director

Leadership at its best

Larry Phillips, the chair of the Metropolitan King County Council here in Washington State, announced his intention not to seek reelection in Fall 2015.  Larry, a board member of the Jackson Foundation, has shown outstanding leadership in our region.  His role as an exemplary public official should be acknowledged.

For two decades Larry has been active in transportation, clean energy and jobs creation, providing a reasoned, informed and highly competent voice for our community.  Always energetic and passionate about issues, Larry has been an important leader in conserving the natural resources of the Puget Sound that we all value.

King County Council Chair Larry Phillips
King County Council Chair Larry Phillips

We at the Jackson Foundation have been fortunate to have Larry associated with us as well.  Two years ago Larry approached the Board with the idea of exploring the connection between climate change and national security threats, an emerging issue.  Given the Jackson legacy in both environmental resource management and national security, this was a natural fit for us, and with Larry’s involvement, we have pursued this topic seriously.  In June 2014 we partnered with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on a high-level symposium, “The Intersection of National Security and Climate Change,” which brought together 40 leaders from federal agencies, state and local governments, NGOs, business, and academia.  Our report was widely disseminated.  This past February we joined with the Center for Naval Analyses and its Military Advisory Board for an in-depth briefing to ensure that the military voice is being heard in the climate change and national security discussion and to advance the political process in the U.S.  Later this spring we will convene other foundations nationally to inform them on the security implications of climate change.  Larry was deeply engaged in these programs.

We know that Larry will remain active as a leader in our region, but we will miss his voice in his official capacity as chair of the Metropolitan King County Council.

Lara Iglitzin, Executive Director

 

Spotlight on Russia

This month the Jackson Foundation partnered with the World Affairs Council of Seattle on a program to focus on recent, troubling events in Russia — with a particular emphasis on the murder of Russian politician Boris Nemtsov steps away from the Kremlin.  The event, which was sold out, featured a panel including Jacqueline Miller, President and CEO of the World Affairs Council and a specialist in Russian foreign policy and U.S.-Russia relations; and Dr. Vladimir Raskin, a Seattle attorney who in the early 1990s co-founded Moscow Center for Human Rights; I joined the panel as well. Carol Vipperman, Senior Advisor to the Foundation and formerly president of the Foundation for Russian and American Economic Cooperation, moderated.

Vladimir

The mood was somber, given the recent assassination and its implications for the future of Russian society and political life.  My remarks focused on the diminishing space for civil society and NGOs and described the crackdown on the media in Russia today.  Vladimir reflected on the span of more than twenty years since the hopeful time when the USSR collapsed and civil society emerged.  That spark of energy and excitement about the possibility of a more democratic Russia has largely dissipated in the wake of this murder and all the murders, draconian laws and political aggression that has been evident in President Putin’s Russia of late.  Jackie Miller highlighted the complexity of relations between the U.S. and Russia and spoke about the impact of sanctions on the Russian domestic economy.  She underlined the uncertainty in Russia’s foreign policy in 2015.  “At least during the Cold War, we understood the rules of the game.  Now it’s anyone’s guess.”

Lara

The crowd had many questions, ranging from the prospects for Russia’s opposition politicians after Nemtsov to the rise of nationalism and what role the West should be playing.  The war in Ukraine loomed large, both in panelists’ remarks and in the questions posed.  Panelists differed as to their predictions about what Putin intended next:  where would he stop?  Were the Baltics next? Moldova?  Would he be satisfied with Crimea, or Eastern Ukraine?  The discussion reflected  Putin’s success at surprising his critics and Western observers today.

Audience

In response to a question regarding which Russia specialists to follow to best assess the situation today, Jackie pointed to an op-ed that I authored in Crosscut, the online magazine, on the murder of Nemtsov and implications for Russia’s future.

We plan to monitor events in Russia closely.

Lara Iglitzin, Executive Director