Right Menu

Upcoming Events

Democracy in Exile: Hans Speier and the Defense Intellectual

Daniel Bessner, Anne H.H. and Kenneth B. Pyle Professorship in American Foreign Policy, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
The Foundation, along with The Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies, is pleased to invite you for a special program in celebration of the inauguration of the Anne H.H. and Kenneth B. Pyle Professorship in American Foreign Policy with Daniel Bessner, a Professorship funded by the Foundation.

Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2017
7:00 - 8:30 p.m.
Walker-Ames Room (Kane Hall 225)
University of Washington, Seattle
This event is free and open to the public.

Why do experts exert so much influence on U.S. foreign policy? This talk explores the strange origins of the expert-based approach to U.S. foreign policymaking that has characterized the last 70 years of American history through an examination of the career of Hans Speier, an exile from the Nazis who became an important foreign policymaker in the early Cold War.

Keynote: Daniel Bessner, recipient of the first Anne H.H. and Kenneth B. Pyle Professorship in American Foreign Policy, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies

Opening Remarks:
John Hempelmann, President of Board of Governors, Henry M. Jackson Foundation

Speaker Introduction: Reşat Kasaba, Director of the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies and Stanley D. Golub Chair of International Studies

Concluding Remarks: Kenneth B. Pyle, Professor Emeritus, Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies and Department of History

About Daniel Bessner: Daniel Bessner received his Ph.D. in history from Duke University. In 2014, he was appointed as Assistant Professor in International Studies at the Jackson School.
He spent the 2015-2016 academic year as an International Security and U.S. Foreign Policy Postdoctoral Fellow at Dartmouth College's John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding, and the 2013-2014 academic year as a Foreign Policy, Security Studies and Diplomatic History Postdoctoral Fellow at Cornell University's Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies.
His book, Democracy in Exile: Hans Speier and the Rise of the Defense Intellectual, will be published in 2018 by Cornell University Press. He has published numerous articles in foreign policy journals, and has received a number of awards and honors.

Kenneth B. Pyle, Professor Emeritus, retired from the University of Washington in 2015 after serving as Professor of History and International Studies for 51 consecutive years. In addition to establishing a reputation as one of the most important historians of modern Japan, he served with distinction as Director of the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies between 1978-1988. Among Professor Pyle's numerous awards and honors is the Order of the Rising Sun, awarded to him by the Japanese government for his contributions to Japanese Studies.

In 1983, Professor Pyle succeeded in his effort to name what was then the School of International Studies after Senator Henry M. Jackson whose untimely passing had shocked our community in that year. Senator Jackson had been an ardent supporter of education and played a very important role in encouraging our school to develop first-rate programs in international and area studies.

In recognition of Professor Pyle's innovative leadership and service to the School and the ideals of Senator Jackson, the Henry M. Jackson Foundation created the Anne H.H. and Kenneth B. Pyle Professorship in American Foreign Policy, a professorship that was originally established in 2005 and renamed in 2015. We are pleased to be able to recognize Professor Daniel Bessner as the first recipient of this new title.



The United States and Russia in a Trump Administration

Andrei Kozyrev
The deeply troubled U.S.-Russia relationship will likely face a new era when Donald Trump becomes President. He vows to improve relations with Moscow and is nominating cabinet officials with close ties with the Kremlin. Putin has responded positively to Trump’s overtures, signaling a willingness to work with the new administration, but ongoing strategic concerns and domestic developments in both countries could make the path to improved relations much harder than expected.

Join the Foundation along with the World Affairs Council for a conversation with former Russian Foreign Minister, Andrei Kozyrev, on the future of the U.S. – Russia relationship in a Trump administration.

January 30, 2017

6:00 pm - 7:30 pm
K& L Gates
925 4th Ave (Floor 29)
Seattle,WA 98104

REGISTER HERE

About the speaker:

Andrei Kozyrev is the former Foreign Minister of the Russian Federation. In 1974 he graduated from the Moscow State Institute for International Relations and subsequently earned a degree in Historical Sciences. He joined the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in 1974 and served as head of the Department of International Organizations from 1989-1990. He became the Foreign Minister of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic in October 1990 and retained his position when the Russian Federation gained independence in 1991. Kozyrev was an early proponent for increased cooperation between the United States and Russia and advocated for the end of the Cold War. He was a participant in the historic decision taken in December 1991 between the leaders of Russia, Belarus, and Ukraine to peacefully dissolve the Soviet Union. As Russia’s first Foreign Minister, Kozyrev promoted a policy of equal cooperation with the newly formed independent states of the former Soviet Union, as well as improved relations with Russia’s immediate neighbors and the West. Kozyrev left the post of Foreign Minister in January 1996, but continued in politics by representing the northern city of Murmansk in the Russian Duma for four years. Since 2000, Kozyrev has lectured on international affairs and served on the boards of a number of Russian and international companies. He is also a distinguished fellow with the Wilson Center’s Kennan Institute.

Henry M. Jackson - Bill Van Ness Lecture Series on Leadership

Featuring Ana Mari Cauce, U.W. President

Leadership for a World in Flux

Tuesday, November 29, 2016

7:00 pm Lecture, Kane Hall 220

University of Washington

Listen to President Cauce's remarks

As the new president of one of the world's great public universities, Ana Mari Cauce is leading the University of Washington in advancing its mission in four key areas: providing a leading-edge student experience, conducting research and scholarship that has a global impact, upholding the UW's dedication to its public mission and infusing the entire university with a commitment to innovation.

As a member of the UW faculty since 1986, Cauce became interim president in March 2015, having previously served as provost and executive vice president, and the UW Board of Regents selected her to become the UW's 33rd president at a special meeting October 13, 2015.

Raised in Miami after emigrating with her family from Cuba, Cauce earned a B.A. in English and psychology from the University of Miami and a Ph.D. in psychology, with a concentration in child clinical and community psychology, from Yale University. For her teaching, scholarship and advocacy, Cauce has received numerous awards, including the Dalmas Taylor Distinguished Contribution Award, the Luis Fernando Estaban Public Service Award, the James M. Jones Lifetime Achievement Award of the American Psychological Association, the Grace Hopper Exemplary Leadership Award and the Distinguished Contribution Award from the Society for Community Research and Action. In 1999 she was awarded the Distinguished Teaching Award, the highest honor the University of Washington gives to faculty members for their work with students in and outside the classroom.